Woooohooooo! Vectornator and I Drew Trees!

Tipsy little trees, a vector test image – shown as a Redbubble sticker product. ©Robin King

Not long ago I talked about the Vectornator app and how I wanted to see if we’d get along OK once I began working with it. There’s good news to report: I drew some trees! And not only did I draw them but also successfully turned them into a much larger image (as a transparency) so they could be uploaded to my Redbubble shop for printing on various products – clothing, prints, cases, bags, clocks, comforters, shower curtains, etc. 

This is a major step forward for me because now I can create work that’s not stuck in one size. That’s because vector images can be enlarged without losing resolution. What this means is that I can make not only new patterns and abstract images that’ll be size-adjustable but also new faces, too! YAY!!!

The image above began life as a 1024x1024px svg image. Once I finished drawing it I converted it to a 4000x4000px png to upload for the Redbubble products test. I could’ve made it larger (big enough to suit the largest allowable product image size) but didn’t need to for the test. More good news: my tipsy little trees worked great.

It’s a new world of art-possibilities!

Should Robins Tweet?

©️Robin King

When Twitter first began, it was a quirky little mystery, a frenzied flapping of wings and cheery chirps from around the world. I joined early (late 2006?). Somewhere in a file I have my “welcome” email from Biz Stone. There was a public feed (see link to 2006, below). Users were encouraged to share their status updates. I’d been asked to join by a friend from a blogging site called “Vox” (not today’s “Vox” but the original one owned by SixApart). So, I joined Twitter and jumped into the stream of people who were telling the world what they were doing and, sometimes, where. 

It was pure excitement! No links – no ads – no images – no gifs – no memes – no polls – no blocked users – no bots – no follows – no promoted tweets! It was, simply and beautifully, people saying a little about themselves to strangers.

But the one big public feed morphed into other things and the rationale behind Twitter changed. EVERYTHING about it changed. I miss the giddiness of old Twitter but today’s version is useful.

I’ve had many accounts there in the intervening years, all for different reasons. 

For people who want to sell their work, Twitter can be a handy tool. I’m still trying to figure out the best way to use it without spending all of my time there. 

In the next couple of weeks I’m going to start using my Twitter account (username: robinkingfaces) again.

Why? Because Robins should tweet.

…..

Link: So funny! A page of “public timeline” tweets from 2006 – courtesy of the Wayback Machine:

http://web.archive.org/web/20061109101219/http://twitter.com/public_timeline