“Who Were You When You Weren’t You?”

“Who Were You When You Weren’t You?” is a small [unfinished] image that I made from two photographs, one acrylic abstract, one digital painting, tissue paper, and a scan of paper pulp made from old advertising circulars. For those who are wondering, my favorite way of “creating art” is to assemble a mishmash of disparate images and materials (such as paper, thread, yarn, cardboard) then put them into digital layers and PLAY. Using the software tools I paint, edit, mask, enlarge, shift, and blend the pixels until the combined image makes my eyes happy. 

It’s that simple.

🤗

8 thoughts on ““Who Were You When You Weren’t You?””

    1. Me? I’m a bad drawer & altho I lovelovelove doing things with paint, I don’t have the patience for it. Digital can be as fast or slow as I want, and I can undo everything to start over if things go wrong. If I could do traditional art better & enjoy it more, I’d probably stick with it. Being able to toss all my missteps and disasters into a multilayered piece is fun. You inspire me to try paint again, to take the time, to work with it & begin to understand it! Thank you more than I can say!!! 🥰👋

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      1. I like using the layers but haven’t got the hang of the use of the differing blending modes – do you play with those also? Any tips about them? And I really do think it’s amazing how you digitize real objects’ patterns and textures then use them on/within a digital image. I’ve mostly just made a digital line art that I then like to paint differing ways on paper – I imagine kids’ll grow up create virtual reality images to play with, lol! 😊

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        1. Hi! Yes, for me, it’s all about blending. I click on every blending option available, for each layer, bec the layers can all change the way they look when they’re blended. It’s like opening a gift: I never know exactly what an image layer will look like before I click on the blending options. After years of working with them I do have some idea but how they appear on their own AND as part of the group of other images is usually something of a surprise. That’s part of the fun. I learned by clicking, trying, looking – then undoing and clicking again. Being able to adjust opacity is good, too. I’ll put together a post for you describing what images were combined to make a new image. Gosh…a tip? I don’t know. I just click and move and paint (with the digital brushes – also using THEIR blending options) until I like what I see. Maybe the most important thing I can say is that you can’t hurt anything. Just try tools and see what they do. If they do something you like, get to know them. You’re an amazing artist! You make magic! Re kids and AI – wow! Yes! Here’s a research paper from 2018. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330476102_Kids_making_AI_Integrating_Machine_Learning_Gamification_and_Social_Context_in_STEM_Education You’re right! They’re starting! Many, many thanks!!!! 🥰👋

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          1. Wonderful reply, thank you so much, Robin – my comment thread’s just been a jumble since our move started, lol! “how they appear on their own AND as part of the group of other images is usually something of a surprise” – that’s what I found too. I guess I need to make a duplicate, then experiment & that way still have my original too; so much to play with, love it! 😊 ❤️

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            1. Hi! Oh, I completely understand things being a jumble! It happens!! And you’re very welcome, about the comment. So you’ve experienced the same thing, working with digital layers! It’s very exciting! Yes, duplicates can be useful, for sure. Take care – and I hope you’re settling in!! Thank you again!! 🤗👋

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